theoperationsblog.com The Operations Blog | Tech Support | Service Operations | Customer Experience | Leadership

theoperationsblog.com
Title: The Operations Blog | Tech Support | Service Operations | Customer Experience | Leadership
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Description: Tech Support | Service Operations | Customer Experience | Leadership
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The Operations Blog | Tech Support | Service Operations | Customer Experience | Leadership About The Operations Blog View All Posts My eBook The Operations Blog Tech Support | Service Operations | Customer Experience | Leadership Home View All Posts My eBook About The Operations Blog RSS Feed Twitter Featured 0 The Evolution Of Doing By Marci Reynolds – June 28, 2016Posted in: Achieving Operations Goals How we think about and talk about what we “do” significantly impacts the satisfaction we get from the activity and the value others feel from the activity. Ponder these 5 phrases: I have to do. I could do. I will do. I want to do. I get to do. The Evolution Of Doing | Image By C.Guoy via FreeDigitalPhotos.ne I would refer to these as the “evolution of doing”. If we think about our activities as have to or could do, the perception is that the activities are chores, and not something we want to do. Once we “get to do” something, it sounds like we received a gift or something that we are very excited about. Employment: Let’s start by talking about our employment. Some people think about their jobs as a daily grind. Work is something to do to collect a paycheck each week. They drag themselves out of bed each Monday, and celebrate at 5PM on Friday. However, what happens when work goes away and it’s not your choice? We all know people who have been laid off or reorganized out of a job. They are often struggling to find work. When we meet them for coffee they tell you their job interview stories. They get feedback or perceive that they are too young, too old, underqualified or overqualified for the roles they are interviewing for. I know from personal experience that you never really know when this could happen to you. Do we need to reframe our thoughts about work? Should work move from something we have to do, to something we get to do? Careers: Next, I want to touch on career development. I am approached by many employees asking for career advice. They want tips on how they can expand their current role or move across or up. Our discussions usually lead to things that the employees “could do” to position themselves for more. These actions include things such as to adjust their communication style, volunteer for high profile assignments or think more about big picture items versus department specific. I also recommend that they get more exposure to senior management. At the end of these discussions the employees tend to respond in one of three ways. 1) Silence. 2) “I could do that” or 3) ‘I will do that”. I know that when employees do not commit to anything or use the word “could”, the likelihood they will take action is low. When employees tell me they “will do that”, I can feel that commitment and action is likely to happen. I strongly believe that we all own our career roadmap, and until we (not our boss, or HR) take action nothing really exciting will happen. Is setting your career up for massive success something that you could do, or something you will do? Health: Last, I want to speak to health and wellness. I do a lot of traveling and as I walk through the airports I always see other travelers in wheel chairs, with walkers and canes, or simply limping along to get to their gates. I also have a number of friends and family members that have suffered serious illnesses. They can no longer live their lives the way they want to. Many of these fellow travelers, friends or family members are my age or much younger. This makes me appreciate the fact that I am (knock on wood) healthy and mobile, and can get anywhere I need to go. With that said, why do I sometimes think to myself “I have to go to the gym”. Instead, I should be happy that I “get to go” to the gym and make myself stronger and more flexible. Why do I sometimes think, “I have to eat this grilled chicken and vegetables instead of nachos”. I could be thinking “I get to eat this nutritious food, so I can stay healthy and have lots of energy to attack the day.” Our brain really does help us set the stage for how we lead our lives. How we think about and talk about what we “do” significantly impacts the satisfaction we get from the activity and the value others feel from the activity. How can we all make the shit from “have to do” to “get to do”. Tags: evolution of doing, get to do, have to do, want to do Recent 0July 13, 2016 10 Best Leadership Communication Posts from 2016 I believe that top notch communication skills are THE most important set of skills that any leader, at any level needs to possess and consistently hone. This includes verbal, written […] 1July 6, 2016 7 Tricks For Telecommuting Triumph I am currently involved in an initiative to help motivate and inspire our telecommuter population. This is just over 10% of our entire employee base. Since these telecommuting team members […] 0June 21, 2016 The Myth Of No Budget, A Corporate America Fairy Tale Do any of these budget related phrases sound familiar? There is no budget for any more travel this year. There is no budget to give your employee a market pay increase. […] 0June 14, 2016 5 Tips To Stop The “Reply All” Email Madness! There is an epidemic in Corporate America that must be stopped! What is it? The consistent use or misuse of the Reply All function in email. As a result, I believe […] 0June 4, 2016 Using Power for Good, Not Evil – 3 Perspectives This week I had the opportunity to attend a women’s leadership symposium in Washington D.C. As I reflect back on the content and the speakers, one of the sessions that […] 0May 5, 2016 Rant: Stop Treating Customer Experience Like A Cost Center The data is clear. Both B2B and B2C buyers are willing to pay more for a better customer experience. So, why do we keep treating customer experience (quality, delivery, people) […] Older Entries Subscribe To This Blog via Email Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Email Address Recent Posts 10 Best Leadership Communication Posts from 2016 7 Tricks For Telecommuting Triumph The Evolution Of Doing The Myth Of No Budget, A Corporate America Fairy Tale 5 Tips To Stop The “Reply All” Email Madness! Using Power for Good, Not Evil – 3 Perspectives Rant: Stop Treating Customer Experience Like A Cost Center Most Popular 10 Tips To Master Customer Escalation Management 5 Steps To Create A Tech Support Capacity Plan 6 Reasons Processes Fail – Cartoon How To Map The Emotional Customer Experience Token Advertisement – Please Click Follow Me On Twitter Tweets by @marcireynolds12 Blogs I Like A Lean Journey Cool Infographics Experience Matters- Temkin Group Forrester's Customer Experience Blog Heidi Cohen's Marketing Blog Information Is Beautiful Leadership Freak Lolly Daskal's Leadership Blog Mark McCarthy's Grow The Business Blog Michael Hyatt's Blog Nametag Scott's Business Blog People Metrics CX Blog Random Acts Of Leadership Switch & Shift Archives Archives Select Month July 2016 June 2016 May 2016 April 2016 March 2016 January 2016 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 May 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 December 2012 September 2012 July 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 About Arras WordPress Theme Copyright The Operations Blog. 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